New York City Subway (Guide)

The New York City Subway represents the central public transportation system in the area. It is considered as one of the largest and oldest transportation systems in the world. With approximately 5.5 million riders on weekdays, it is one of the primary transportation means for the majority of tourists and locals. A subsidiary of The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is responsible for the operation of the system.

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More about New York City Subway (Guide)

New York City Subway (Guide)

The New York City Subway represents the central public transportation system in the area. It is considered as one of the largest and oldest transportation systems in the world. With approximately 5.5 million riders on weekdays, it is one of the primary transportation means for the majority of tourists and locals. A subsidiary of The Metropolitan Transportation Authority is responsible for the operation of the system.

The subway system frequently is referred to as the "trains" and never as the tube, underground or metro.

The NYC Subway is currently operating in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx and never leave New York City.

Every day, more than 4.5 million passengers are using the subway in New York. Regardless of how crowded it is, the subway in New York is considered to be the one institution that locals or tourists could not do without.

History

At 02:35 pm on October 27, 1904, Mayor George McClellan took the controls on the inaugural run of New York's innovative new rapid transit system, today known as the subway.

While Boston built the first subway system in the U.S. and London boasted the world's oldest underground train network, NYC managed to become the most significant American system.

On the evening of the opening day, the subway opened to the general public, and more than 100,000 paid to take their first ride under Manhattan. The first line that was operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit company traveled more than nine miles through 28 stations.

In 1905 IRT services expanded to the Bronx. Since 1968 the subway network has been controlled by the MTA.

Currently, the system includes 26 lines and 468 stations. The network is one of the most extended Subway systems, and overall contains 245 miles of routes.

Interesting facts

  • Only about 60% of NYC subway is underground
  • NYC subway ranks as the seventh for number of annual subway riders
  • The A train represents the longest route in 31-miles
  • New York City Subway System includes nine ghost stations
  • Top ten busiest subway stations are all in Manhattan
  • Putting feet on the seat is considered as crimes and police can arrest the passenger
  • In 1953 the subway started taking tokens instead of coins
  • Before Union

    NYC's first subway network was made up of three different companies that were competing against each other. The train is relatively wide when the one train is relatively narrow. The Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT), Independent Rapid Transit Railroad (IND) and Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit (BMT) lines were operating independently until 1953. Even though New York's first official subway line is considered to be the IRT, which started its operations in 1904, the elevated E.I. ran up and down 9th. Avenue and Greenwich street since 1870. Currently, IND and BMT form the lettered lines, when old lines of IRT represent numbered ones.